One of the most popular baits used throughout the year would have to a jig. Jigs come in many styles, colors, and sizes. Joel Nelson helps answer some of the question anglers have in regards to the walleye jig.

To start off we will discuss jig weight.

Jigs are the most effective when they have a slow natural fall rate, so as a general rule of thumb I will fish the lightest jig I can. That being said I still need to be able to feel the bottom and jig, so you never want to go too light.

When choosing a jig weight a lot of it depends on the depth you are fishing and the size of bait you have on your jig.

In shallower water I will usually be using a lighter walleye jig like a 1/16th ounce or 1/8th ounce. As I get deeper the jig weight will increase.

When it comes to jig color I really like to have a contrast between my jig and the bait I am using.

As an example if I have am going to use a chartreuse plastic, I will pair with with a dark jig head. If I am going to use a leech I will usually pair it with a hot pink or orange colored jig.

I just feel that the contrast helps the walleyes see my bait easier.

When it comes to choosing a color based on the water clarity I like to stick with natural colors in clear water, and I will use bright UV colors in stained water.

There are a bunch of jig styles out there and they are all designed for certain situations. I would say the jig I use the most is your standard short shank live bait jig, like Northland’s Fireball jig.

For larger minnows or big plastics I will switch over to the long shank jigs. If I am going to be fishing heavy cover I’ll use a jig with a weed guard to help keep it clean and prevent snags.

Choosing the rig jig style all depends on what you need your bait to do.