Live strike walleyes are what everyone wants to experience. Effective, fish-producing jigging techniques can vary from day to day, even hour to hour. So savvy anglers have a host of tricks up their icy sleeves for deployment at a moment’s notice.

But ask these anglers about specific cadences and it’s always over-simplified or hard to translate; even worse, a bunch of jibberish and onomatopoeia. For example, “twitch it a few times,” “high rips and rest,” or “pound bottom.” Okay, we understand that last one…

It’s probably a lot like learning dance moves or martial arts forms. And here comes the cliché: the devil’s in the details (not the woodpile this time).

The best way to learn sure-fire jigging techniques is to watch a master – guys like Dave Genz and Brian “Bro” Brosdahl. But sometimes they’re even at a loss for words – given decades of ice-time, it’s pure muscle memory for them. You can study their videos, but the real magic is happening under water. Honestly, the best way to learn sure-fire jigging techniques is to watch how fish respond on your Aqua-Vu UW camera! Just like in this video captured by Bill Lindner Photography.

Here’s something else that struck us as odd. Unlike dance or blood sport, there are no names for specific jigging techniques, no ice fishing equivalent of the “Whip/Nae Nae” or roundhouse kick.

That’s right, we need names for these jigging moves… So, we went ahead and named some of the best.
“The Zeeb Tickler,” “Puff Daddy,” “Dickie’s Limp Chimp,” “The High School Dropout,” “The Walleye Whip/Nae Nae,” “The DTs,” “The Junkyard Dog,” “The Striptease,” and “The Love Tap.”

Let us know on the AnglingBuzz Facebook page what you call your favorite jigging moves!

Special thanks to the folks at Hunters Point Resort.