If you want a reliable boat and a healthier engine, you need to understand the impact that gum, varnish and old fuel can have. The sooner you start implementing smart fuel management into your boating practices, the better off your outboard engine will be in the long term.

We’ve learned a lot about how to maintain a healthier engine from our friends at Sea Foam. Last week, Jeremy Smith went bass fishing with Brian Miller from Sea Foam and asked him three questions. Two of them were fishing related, but the other was focused on keeping your engine running smoothly:

#1 – What’s your favorite bite?

Brian: “Largemouth bass on a short line.”

#2 – What’s your least favorite bite?

Brian: “Pike on a short line.”

#3 – What would be the best advice that you could give to boaters in less than 60 seconds?

Brian: “The number one cause of marine engine problems has always been sticky fuel gum and varnish. Using Sea Foam Marine Pro in your fuel systems will work to clear away that gum and varnish. The next thing would be fuel evaporation. Gasoline evaporates fast and the best, highly volatile ignition vapors are the first to go, so try not to have fuel in your tank for a long time. Try not to fill it and leave it in there for a month or two at a time. The third thing, that leads to fuel management. Rather than filling a tank like this 30, 40, 50 gallon boat tank. Put 5 gallons or 10 gallons in at a time, that way you’re always replenishing light ignition vapor back into the fuel. That’s it. That’s my best advice.”

Thanks Brian! I know it’s easier to top off your fuel tank – less trips to the gas station means less hassle – but that not the optimal strategy for a maintaining a healthier engine. At the end of the day, having LESS gum and varnish and MORE light ignition vapor is going to lead more time on the water and less time with your boat at the shop.

Take this advice to heart and try to implement it – you can thank us later!